Tuesday, July 19, 2022

Dr Caroline Tully CV


CURRICULUM VITAE


CAROLINE TULLY PhD.

E-mail: tullyc@unimelb.edu.au

Web: unimelb.academia.edu/CarolineTully

 

EDUCATION

2017  PhD.  Aegean Bronze Age Art and Archaeology, University of Melbourne.                                                  

2007–2009  Postgraduate Diploma, Arts (Classics and Archaeology), University of Melbourne.

2005–2007  Graduate Diploma, Arts (Classics and Archaeology), University of Melbourne.

2004   Continuing Education, Arts (Classics and Archaeology), University of Melbourne.

1993–1995  Bachelor of Arts, Fine Art (Textiles and Printmaking), Monash University.

 

AWARDS and FELLOWSHIPS

2019  The British School at Athens, Richard Bradford McConnell Fund for Landscape Studies.

2018  Honorary Fellow, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne; Nominee for the Chancellor’s Prize for Excellence in the PhD, University of Melbourne.

2015  The Postgraduate Ancient World Award.

2013  The Jessie Webb Scholarship.

2012  The Faculty of Arts, University of Melbourne, Graduate Research in Arts Travel Scheme; The School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne, School Research Allocation Grant; The School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne Graduate Grant.

2011  The Alma Hansen Scholarship; The Norman Macgeorge Scholarship; The Prue Torney Memorial Prize; The Australian Federation of University Women Victoria: William and Elizabeth Fisher Scholarship and Bursaries in Memory of Feminist Fathers – Special Award; The Melbourne Abroad Travelling Scholarship (MATS): Riady Travelling Scholarship 2011; The Barrett Trust 2011; The School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne, School Research Allocation Grant.

2009  Australian Postgraduate Award; The Biblical Archaeology Society Dig Scholarship, for Tell es-Safi/Gath, Israel.

 

EMPLOYMENT

2022  Museums Victoria, Provenance Researcher and Consultant; editor Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Australian Tapestry Workshop, artisan/weaver

2021  University of Melbourne, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, Lecturer / Honours Seminar Facilitator / Tutor

2020  University of Melbourne, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, Teaching Assistant / Tutor/ Lecturer

2019  University of Melbourne, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, Teaching Assistant / Tutor/ Lecturer; Archaeologist at Dr Vincent Clark and Associates | Archaeology and Cultural Heritage.

2018  University of Melbourne, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, Teaching Assistant / Tutor/ Lecturer; Research Assistant.

2017  University of Melbourne, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, Teaching Assistant / Tutor/ Lecturer; Faculty of Arts, Research Assistant and Antiquities Curator; Institut für Orientalische und Europäische Archäologie (OREA), Sub-editor.

2016  University of Melbourne, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, Teaching Assistant / Tutor; Hamilton Art Gallery, Curator Mediterranean Antiquities Exhibition; Ian Potter Museum of Art, Classics and Archaeology Gallery, Guest Lecturer.

2015  La Trobe University, Centre for Mediterranean Studies, Teaching Assistant / Tutor; University of Melbourne, Teaching Assistant / Tutor/ Lecturer; University College, Parkville, Teaching Assistant / Tutor.

2014  Ian Potter Museum of Art, Classics and Archaeology Gallery, Presenter/facilitator for the Secondary Schools Program.

2013  Ian Potter Museum of Art, Classics and Archaeology Gallery, Presenter/facilitator within the Secondary Schools Program; University of Melbourne, Teaching Assistant / Tutor/ Lecturer.

2010–2012  University of Melbourne, Teaching Assistant / Tutor/ Lecturer.

1996–2010  Australian Tapestry Workshop, Tapestry Weaver/Artisan.

1999–2005  Federal Publishing Company, Feature Writer and Reviewer for Witchcraft Magazine.

 

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

2021  Fourth Year/Honours ‘Problems in Greek Prehistory’, University of Melbourne. 

2016–2021, 2010–2013  Third Year ‘Interpreting the Ancient World’, University of Melbourne.

2016–2019  Second Year ‘Ancient Greece: History and Archaeology’, University of Melbourne.

2017, 2015, 2010  First Year ‘Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia’, University of Melbourne.

2015  First Year ‘Ancient Greece: Myth, Art, War’, La Trobe University; Second Year ‘Classical Mythology’, University College, Parkville.

2014  Secondary Schools Program, Ian Potter Museum of Art, Classics and Archaeology Gallery, University of Melbourne.

2013  Second Year ‘Egypt Under the Pharaohs’, University of Melbourne; Secondary Schools Program, Ian Potter Museum of Art, Classics and Archaeology Gallery, University of Melbourne.

2012–2013  Second Year ‘Egyptian and Near Eastern Myth’, University of Melbourne.

 

CURATORIAL AND MUSEUM CONSULTATION EXPERIENCE

2022  Museums Victoria, Provenance Researcher and Consultant for the ‘Open Horizons’ exhibition from the National Museum of Athens

2017  Arts West Gallery, Faculty of Arts, University of Melbourne, Curator for the ‘Decadence and Domesticity’ section of The Arts of Engagement exhibition.

2016  Hamilton Art Gallery, Curator for Mediterranean Antiquities Exhibition.

2015–2016  Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Assistant Curator, Mummymania Exhibition.

 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD EXPERIENCE

2019  Archaeologist at Koonwarra Salvage, Victoria, Australia.

2009–2012  Archaeologist at Tell es-Safi/Gath, Israel.

2011  Archaeologist at Caesarea Maritima, Israel.

 

BOOKS

Minoan Transcorporeality. Munich: Theion Publishing (forthcoming).

The Cultic Life of Trees in the Prehistoric Aegean, Levant, Egypt and Cyprus. Aegaeum 42. Peeters: Leuven, 2018.

 

SELECTED ARTICLES AND CHAPTERS

‘Lifting the Veil of Isis: Egyptian Reception and the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.” In Alternative Egyptology: Papers in Honour of Willem van Haarlem, edited by Ben van den Bercken. Allard Pierson Museum, Amsterdam.

‘Against Nature: Tree-Shaking Action in Minoan Glyptic Art as Agonistic Behaviour.’ In Gesture – Stance – Movement: Communicating Bodies in the Aegean Bronze Age, edited by Ute Günkel-Maschek, Céline Murphy, Fritz Blakolmer and Diamantis Panagiotopoulos. Heidelberg University Publishing (In Press).

 ‘Agonistic Scenes.’ In The Blackwell Companion to Aegean Art and Architecture, edited by Louise Hitchcock and Brent Davis. Oxford: Blackwell (In Press).

‘Introduction to The Pomegranate special issue on Pagans and Museums.’ Pomegranate: International Journal of Pagan Studies 23: 1–2. 2022.

‘Understanding the language of trees: ecstatic experience and interspecies communication in Late Bronze Age Crete.’ In Ecstatic Experience in the Ancient World, edited by Sarah Costello, Karen Foster and Diana Stein. London: Routledge, 2021.

‘Traces of places: sacred sites in miniature on Minoan gold rings.’ In Sacred Sites and Sacred Stories: Transmission of Oral Tradition, Myth, and Religiosity, edited by David Kim, 11–40. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021.

‘Cockles, mussels, fishing nets and finery: the relationship between cult, textiles and the sea depicted on a Minoan-style gold ring from Pylos.’ Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies. Special issue the ‘Entangled Sea’ edited by Ina Berg and Louise Hitchcock. 8: 3-4. 2020. 365–378.

‘Enthroned Upon Mountains: Constructions of Power in the Aegean Bronze Age.’ Co-authored with S. Crooks. In The Ancient Throne. The Mediterranean, the Near East, and Beyond, 3rd millennium BCE 0 14th Century CE. Proceedings of the Workshop held at ICANNE in Vienna, April 2016, edited by Liat Naeh and Dana Brostowsky Gilboa, 37–59. Vienna: OREA, 2020.

‘Celtic Egyptians: Isis Priests of the Lineage of Scota.’ In Ancient Egypt in the Modern Imagination, edited by Eleanor Dobson and Nichola Tonks, 145–160. London: Bloomsbury, 2020.

‘Power Ranges: Identity and Terrain in Minoan Crete.’ Co-authored with S. Crooks. Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature, and Culture 13: 2. 2019. 130–156.

‘The Self Possessed: Framing Identity in Late Minoan Glyptic.’ Co-authored with S. Crooks. In ΜΝΗΜΗ / Mneme: Past and Memory in the Aegean Bronze Age, Aegaeum 43, edited by Elisabetta Borgna, Ilaria Caloi, Filippo Carinci and Robert Laffineur, 749–752. Peeters: Leuven, 2019.

‘The artifice of Daidalos: Modern Minoica as religious focus in contemporary Paganism.’ In New Antiquities: Transformations of Ancient Religion in the New Age and Beyond, edited by Dylan Burns and Almut-Barbara Renger, 76–102. Sheffield: Equinox, 2019.

‘Introduction to The Pomegranate special issue on Paganism, Art, and Fashion.’ The Pomegranate: International Journal of Pagan Studies 21:2. 2019. 141–145.

‘The artifice of Daidalos: Modern Minoica as religious focus in contemporary Paganism.’ The International Journal for the Study of New Religions 8: 2. 2018. 183–212.

‘Thalassocratic Charms: Trees, Boats, Women and the Sea in Minoan Glyptic Art.’ Proceedings of the 12th International Congress of Cretan Studies, 24th September 2016, Heraklion, Crete. 2018. 1–12.

‘Egyptosophy in the British Museum: Florence Farr, the Egyptian Adept and the Ka.’ In The Occult Imagination in Britain, 1875–1947, edited by Christine Ferguson and Andrew Radford, 131–145. London: Routledge, 2018.

‘Virtual Reality: Tree Cult and Epiphanic Ritual in Aegean Glyptic Iconography.’ Journal of Prehistoric Religion. Robin Hägg memorial issue. Vol. XXV: 19–30. 2016.

‘Numinous tree and stone: re-animating the Minoan landscape.’ Co-authored with S. Crooks and L. Hitchcock. In METAPHYSIS: Ritual Myth and Symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age. Aegaeum 39. E. Alram-Stern, F. Blakolmer, S. Deger-Jalkotzy, R. Laffineur and J. Weilhartner (eds), 157–164. Leuven: Peeters, 2016.

‘Dropping Ecstasy? Minoan Cult and the Tropes of Shamanism.’ Co-authored with Sam Crooks. Time and Mind: The Journal for Archaeology Consciousness and Culture. 8.2: 129–158. 2015.

‘Museums of Israel.’ In Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology. Claire Smith (Ed.) Springer: New York, 2014.  

‘The British Museum’. In Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology. Claire Smith (Ed.) Springer:  New York, 2014. 

‘The Sacred Life of Trees: What trees say about people in the prehistoric Aegean and Near East.’ In Proceedings of the 33rd Australian Society for Classical Studies Conference. 2012. Available online at http://www.ascs.org.au/news/ascs33/index.html

‘Walk Like an Egyptian: Egypt as Authority in Aleister Crowley’s Reception of The Book of the Law.’ The Pomegranate: International Journal of Pagan Studies 12:1. 2010. 20–47.

Report on the excavation at Tell es-Safi/Gath, Israel, 2009. Biblical Archaeology Review 36: 1. (Jan/Feb 2010). Available online at http://www.bib-arch.org/e-features/scholarship-recipient-report.asp

                                         

REFEREES

Professor Louise Hitchcock  Room 674, Level 6, Arts West, University of Melbourne. Ph: 8344 7033, Email: l.hitchcock@unimelb.edu.au

Associate Professor Andrew Jamieson  Room 673, Level 6 Arts West, University of Melbourne. Ph: 8344 3403, Email: asj@unimelb.edu.au

 

Downloadable version of my CV.

Thursday, June 16, 2022

Find Out Why I'm So Fascinating!

Thanks to E.V. Escher for interviewing me on the 100th episode of The Disembodied Podcast: a non-religious tour of spiritual topics. I love talking about my favourite topics, ancient and contemporary Pagan religions, magic, and modern witchcraft. I've titled this post somewhat blatantly, because the internet is just getting so full of people competing for attention, I've had to up the ante for attention seeking. Listen to me rather than those internet poseurs! I'm actually knowledgeable. 

 

Sunday, April 10, 2022

Tarot at Muses of Mystery

I am a modern witch who studies ancient pagan religions. Through my tarot readings I provide guidance from the realm of the invisibles in order to help clients investigate their desires, make choices, create ways to move forward, and embrace personal transformation. I am a regular workshop facilitator on a range of magickal subjects, and also have a Doctor of Philosophy with a background in archaeology.

I first learned tarot in 1984. In the early 1990s I worked as a professional tarot reader at a shop called Mythical Moon in St Kilda, Melbourne, Australia. Now I work as a reader at Muses of Mystery, also in Melbourne in the city. I'm there on Thursdays and Saturdays.

I own many decks but my deck of choice is the one I learned on, the Crowley-Harris Thoth deck. I think it is the best tarot deck available. Recently I have become quite interested in The Carnival at the End of the World deck and the Tarot of theDrowning World, both designed by Kahn and Selesnik, and with accompanying books by Sarah Falkner, who channels Madame Lulu. I highly recommend them though, and the books are excellent.


Thursday, March 17, 2022

The Eleusinian Mysteries and Aleister Crowley’s Rites of Eleusis Workshop

 

Of all the ancient Mediterranean Mystery Religions, those concerning the grain goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone were the oldest and most famous. Celebrated for over one thousand years at the Greek city of Eleusis and then suppressed during the Christian era, the Mysteries have again become the focus of Pagan attention. Occurring at both the Spring and Autumn Equinoxes, these secret rites dedicated to the Two Goddesses and their roles in the establishment of agriculture were an annual highlight of the ancient Greek religious calendar. This workshop focuses on the influence of the Eleusinian Mysteries on the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, and on their most notorious initiate Aleister Crowley, and explains how these magical trail blazers were inspired by the mysteries to design their own theatrical rituals. Through images, discussion, and practical exercises, contemporary approaches to dramatic ritual will be explored.

The presenter:  Caroline Tully is interested in the practical side of magic and has been a modern Witch since 1985. She has written for many Pagan and occult publications and was a feature writer for Australia’s Witchcraft Magazine for six years. Caroline is also an archaeologist who studies ancient Mediterranean Pagan religions and their manifestation in the modern world. 


Saturday 19th March, 11.00am - 3.00pm.

At Muses of Mystery  Phone: 0488 139 435

 


Thursday, February 17, 2022

Australian Wiccan Conference 2022 LOGO REVEAL!​​​​​​​​


 2022 LOGO REVEAL!​​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​​We're so excited to share with you the logo for AWC 2022, designed by Urbanfaun.​​​​​​​​
​​​​​​​​
The 38th annual Australian Wiccan Conference will take place on the 16th-18th of September on Victoria's Great Ocean Road. Tickets and more information available soon.

Saturday, February 12, 2022

Australian Wiccan Conference 16th - 18th September 2022

 

I'm one of the organisers of this year's conference! Save the date! The 38th annual Australian Wiccan Conference will take place on the 16th-18th of September on Victoria's Great Ocean Road. Tickets and more information available soon.

Friday, November 19, 2021

I'm presenting at the 2021 American Academy of Religion



I'm presenting at the American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, in the Theory and Method in the Study of Religion, Attire, and Adornment session on Sunday November 21st, 5.00 - 6.30pm (CST). This is what my paper will be about:

Power Un/Dressing: Revealing the Goddess in Contemporary Occult Religion

The Ordo Templi Orientis, Wicca, and the Church of Satan are three new religious movements that are part of the occultist stream of Western esotericism. Female nudity features prominently in their most important rituals. Priestesses disrobe in order to represent incarnate goddesses and become objects of worship. While unclothed in these rituals, the priestesses are not undressed; various supplements to the body are incorporated in their ritual costume such as veils, belts, jewellery and tiaras, and objects are held and carried. The adorned female body of the priestess situated within the ritual mise en scène is laden with symbolism and functions as a visual didactic assemblage that communicates essential tenets of the religions. Theories of glamour are used as investigatory lenses to examine the effects on ritual participants, and the wider public, of the occult priestess’s nudity-as-dress. The priestesses’ glamour is a form of powerful magic that enchants the viewer and an empowering feminist reclamation of the body as the locus of an immanent deity, simultaneously juxtaposed with the phenomenon of the glamour girl or pin-up and the objectification of women.


I'm also on a panel on 'Magic and Museums: Scholars and Practitioners' chaired by Amy Hale in the Contemporary Pagan Studies Unit at the American Academy of Religion annual meeting, Monday 22 Nov, 9:00-11:00am (CST).